Tag: clocks

Collecting Wall & Carriage Clocks

Collecting Wall & Carriage Clocks

Collecting Wall & Carriage Clocks – Wall clocks come in large variety of shapes and sizes, and are either weight- or spring-driven. They range from the often imaginative Black Forest clocks, first made in the 17th century, to the simple English round-dial clocks introduced in the late 18th century and the expensive, high quality early 19th-century Vienna regulators with their severe, architectural lines and ebony or boxwood cases.

American wall clocks, made from the 1780s onwards, began to be exported to England in great numbers during the middle of the 19th century and proved so popular that they had an adverse effect on the English clock-making industry.

Novelty Clocks

Novelty Clocks

Novelty Clocks – The earliest surviving working novelty clocks were German automata made in Augsburg in the 1650s involving mechanical figures, either of human or animal form, which performed as the hour struck. They include dogs, and, most extraordinarily for the early date, cockerels which flapped their wings and opened and closed their mouth, often making a crowing sound. The earliest novelty clock in history is the celebrated crowing cock of the Strasbourg Cathedral clock, made in 1354 and now preserved in the Strasbourg Museum.

These astonishing pieces continued to be made until the 18th century, when they fell out of favor, but the novelty clock enjoyed a revival in the Black Forest area of Germany in the 19th century and included the pie-eating man who lifts a fork to his mouth on the hour.